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Posts Tagged ‘weymouth’

Philip Brown Kahn’s page has been added to the ‘biographies’ tab. Please take a look. Comments are invited. If you have anything to add, please e-mail: contactus@kahngene.org.uk

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We’ve just uploaded a new page with a short history of G B Kahn.

Please take a look by clicking on the ‘biographies’ tab. All (no – most) comments welcome.

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A short history of the Dubber family has just been added to the ‘biographies’ tab. As all amateur genealogists will know, trying to confirm information, or verify hearsay, is difficult and immensely frustrating despite the wealth of collective knowledge available on line.

Chinese whispers bounce around the ether. Stories filtering down through generations are often misinterpreted or befuddled, so they are picked up in one form and passed on with variations just significant enough to send the researcher poking around in the wrong places.

The Dubber family genealogy is a case in point. Originally we thought Amy (today she would be a great-great-grandmother to our youngest generation) came from Bodmin. That’s what we were told. Now we’ve discovered she was born in Pimlico, but her brother James married a Bodmin girl. Amy’s youngest sister, Daisy Susan, at age 10, was in Bodmin for the 1901 census, staying with James’s wife Mary Grace. Thus Chinese whispers tried to lead us astray.

Amy’s father, another James, died in Weymouth. Apparently, Amy wanted to leave London for the sake of the health of her elder son, Philip. According to legend, she closed her eyes, stuck a pin into a map of England and discovered Weymouth. Whether she actually followed her father, or vice versa, we don’t know, but they both ended up in the same town, living within a few yards of each other.

Chinese whispers say Amy was there when he died. Yet copy of the certificate reveals his death was registered by his daughter “Mrs A. Allen.” As far as we know, James had two daughters with initials A, one being Amy and the other Alice Rose. Amy was Amy Kahn, wasn’t she? Yet we can’t find a trace of a marriage (or relationship) between Alice and an Allen. So who was Mrs A. Allen?

Perhaps we’re delving too deeply. If we could be satisfied with bare bones, we already have a substantial, if skeletal, family history in the form of dates of main events. But every morsel of data we uncover tends to throw up yet more questions. How can we resist seeking the answers?

Skeletons are fine for anatomical study, but we need flesh and muscle to see the personality beyond the nodes and joints.

That’s why we wonder about Amy – and Alice – and little Daisy Susan. Incidentally, we believe the youngest Dubber sister married Harold James Tarling in 1889, but we can’t be sure.

contactus@kahngene.org.uk if you have any ideas.

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